FOUR YEARS OF THIS BELONGS IN A MUSEUM

thisbelongsinamuseum:

Earlier in the week this blog’s 4th anniversary came and went, like a plastic bag blowing around an empty parking lot. My very first post was nothing too exciting, just explaining the overall purpose of the blog, which I think I am still pretty much doing, although not as often as…
kadampapenny:

We attain permanent liberation from lower rebirth by sincerely relying upon the Three jewels: Buddha - the source of all refuge, Dharma - the realization of Buddha’s teachings, and Sangha - pure Dharma practioners who help us with our spiritual practice.  - Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, The New Meditation Handbook

kadampapenny:

We attain permanent liberation from lower rebirth by sincerely relying upon the Three jewels: Buddha - the source of all refuge, Dharma - the realization of Buddha’s teachings, and Sangha - pure Dharma practioners who help us with our spiritual practice.  - Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, The New Meditation Handbook

(Source: kadampapennies, via dancingdakini)

kadampapenny:

We attain permanent liberation from lower rebirth by sincerely relying upon the Three jewels: Buddha - the source of all refuge, Dharma - the realization of Buddha’s teachings, and Sangha - pure Dharma practioners who help us with our spiritual practice.  - Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, The New Meditation Handbook

kadampapenny:

We attain permanent liberation from lower rebirth by sincerely relying upon the Three jewels: Buddha - the source of all refuge, Dharma - the realization of Buddha’s teachings, and Sangha - pure Dharma practioners who help us with our spiritual practice.  - Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, The New Meditation Handbook

(Source: kadampapennies, via dancingdakini)

letmypeopleshow:

Have You Seen My Mom’s Sculptures?

She was the only mom I knew who had an accent and a kiln. 

My mom, the Vienna-born Anne Cembalest, left us in May at the age of 90. Here she is with some of her trompe l’oeil ceramic sculptures, which she fired in our basement and painted in acrylic at a small table in my bedroom. The bottom photo shows one of her proudest moments, when the legendary Gene Moore put her works in Tiffany’s windows, adorning them with bejeweled bugs. 

Mom sold her eye-fooling vessels, bursting with apples, onions, and other fare and sometimes embellished with real sesame seeds and scallion tops, at crafts fairs around Long Island and in galleries including Incorporated on Madison Avenue. I am starting to assemble an inventory. If anyone comes across an Anne Cembalest clay cornucopia, pickle jar, fruit basket, or cheese plate, I’d love to see a photo. 

(via manbartlett)

bobbycaputo:

A Cajun Courir

Louisiana’s Cajun country, home to a collection of towns settled by French Canadians in the late eighteenth century, lies in the expansive swamp and prairie region between New Orleans and the Texas border. Each year, on the day before Ash Wednesday, several Cajun towns host Courir de Mardi Gras, a ceremonial run that is believed to have its roots in Medieval French begging customs. Participants travel the countryside on horseback and on foot, soliciting ingredients for a communal gumbo that is prepared at the end of the run. The most coveted foodstuffs are live chickens, which are tossed into the air by residents and chased down by runners along the way. The elaborate costumes, crafted by participants, were traditionally intended to mock aristocrats; the capuchons, or crowned hats, for example, originally satirized the headpieces worn by noblewomen in Medieval France.

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magictransistor:

The Picayune [Carnival Edition] Krewe of Proteus 24th Representation;  Proteus (Mardi Gras Float Designs), New Orleans, March 6th, 1905.

magictransistor:

The Picayune [Carnival Edition] Krewe of Proteus 24th Representation; Proteus (Mardi Gras Float Designs), New Orleans, March 6th, 1905.

drlarrysalt:

An assortment of images from the Skeleton Krewe’s march on Mardi Gras day, New Orleans, 2014. The full gallery is available here and showcases all the costumes.